Publishing

Matthew Welch

When I started at Berkeley my mentoring relationships were mainly informal and my mentors were junior faculty friends in my department as well as senior faculty with whom I shared research interests. However, I now see that new faculty can benefit from a broader spectrum of mentoring and advising relationships.

Sanjay Kumar

I have been on the Berkeley faculty since 2005 and currently direct QB3-Berkeley. I chaired the Department of Bioengineering from 2019-22, where I oversaw multiple successful faculty/staff recruitment and retention cases and wrote many Chair's letters for merit, tenure, and promotion. In addition to formally mentoring junior faculty in my department, I have served on a number of department and campus ad hoc committees and written >50 external tenure and promotion letters. I look forward to drawing upon all of these experiences as I advise my faculty colleagues.

Sonia Katyal

I have served as an Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development for several years (both here and elsewhere) at the Law School and can advise colleagues regarding mentoring, campus leadership and collaboration, work/life balance, and how to design research projects that engage with various communities.

Kris Gutiérrez

I believe mentoring the next generation of scholars, particularly first generation faculty and students, is one of the most important responsibilities and commitments I have. I have had the privilege of mentoring and apprenticing both students (graduate, undergraduate, and postdocs) and faculty (particularly early and mid-career faculty) at my institutions and in professional arenas since I was an early career scholar myself. Presently, I am also a mentor for dissertation, postdoctoral, and mid-career fellows for the National Academy of Education & the Spencer Foundation.

Noah Whiteman

I am thrilled to be on the faculty in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California. Because of my personal history, I am interested in encouraging those from all backgrounds to join and enrich the scientific enterprise with their perspectives--this includes, of course, those with liberal and conservative political perspectives, those who hold religious views and those who do not, those from big cities or those from rural areas. I am a first-generation college student. I was the first openly gay faculty member in my department at the University of Arizona and I am also the first in my new department at the University of California, Berkeley. I have found academia to be an oasis: at each university where I have worked I came to believe that I belonged there. I look forward to the day when none of us is judged by non-merit based criteria, where none of us has to talk about rising above societal perceptions of income, ethnicity, religion, physical traits, accents, sexual orientation or gender, political opinions and where human diversity is embraced in all of its forms, at all levels in our society and in every place. Until that day comes, we need to talk about it.

Lisa García Bedolla

As a core advisory I bring my twenty years of experience navigating the UC system as a woman of color. I have expertise in understanding complex institutions and ensuring that your needs are met within those institutions. When mentoring junior faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates I have focused on helping them to find their voice, their joy, and the career path that best meets their professional and personal needs.

Serena Chen

I have served as a primary mentor for graduate students for nearly 25 years. These graduate students have come from very diverse backgrounds, with equally diverse current circumstances, and a broad range of strengths, interests, and career goals. Over the years, I have also mentored and regularly offered advice to junior (and sometimes) senior colleagues. My approach to mentoring/advising is direct and pragmatic, but also compassionate.