Time management

Benjamin Recht

I have mentored undergraduate, graduate students, and junior faculty in Computer Science at Berkeley since I arrived in 2013. I look forward to working with faculty at the assistant and associate levels to navigate their way towards success at Berkeley.

Serena Chen

I have served as a primary mentor for graduate students for nearly 25 years. These graduate students have come from very diverse backgrounds, with equally diverse current circumstances, and a broad range of strengths, interests, and career goals. Over the years, I have also mentored and regularly offered advice to junior (and sometimes) senior colleagues. My approach to mentoring/advising is direct and pragmatic, but also compassionate.

Raka Ray

I bring to the role of a core advisor both a long and engaged history of mentoring students and younger colleagues and experience of leadership at multiple levels.

Rebecca Heald

I have entered a career stage in which mentoring has become as important to me as research. By engaging in the Life Sciences Initiative to enhance faculty diversity and inclusion, and as Associate Dean of the BEST Region, I hope to improve the situation for new faculty and make the Berkeley campus more inclusive and supportive of all our constituents.

Rachel Morello-Frosch

As Division Chair and Equity Liaison in ESPM, and DrPH Program Director in the School of Public Health, I have collaborated with faculty colleagues, staff and students to advance the diversity equity and inclusion mission of UC Berkeley, through development and implementation of DEI plans for my units and programs. I co-led efforts with colleagues to develop faculty cluster hire proposals, including one on climate change and environmental justice, and also worked to improve recruitment, retention and mentoring of faculty, post-docs and students from under-represented groups.

Matthew B. Francis

I think one of the most difficult challenges Berkeley faculty face is time management. The competing demands of research, teaching, student mentoring, committee service, and family life can be completely overwhelming at times, and one must learn that not everything can be done to perfection. While I certainly don’t claim to have all of the answers, I am happy to discuss challenges and strategies with faculty who are developing their plan to navigate this challenging but rewarding career.

Martin Head-Gordon

I hope that I can be a useful sounding board for many of the challenges that young faculty face in trying to succeed at Berkeley. I will be happy to listen, to discuss, and to advise as best I can on any topic of interest or concern. While I have considerable experience in mentoring and advising, it is also enough to make me quite sure that I do not know all the answers!

Amani Allen

The most important thing I bring to my role as a Core Advisor is my passion for mentoring and for cultivating and helping to create an environment where ALL faculty can thrive. I have had good mentoring, bad mentoring, and at times no mentoring; and have both experienced and witnessed the inequities in mentoring among faculty in higher education which fuels my commitment to ensuring that faculty have what they need to develop into their full potential, particularly women, faculty of color, and women faculty of color. I have experience mentoring across the academic pipeline from students, to junior and mid-career faculty both in formal and informal capacities, and am excited to partner with OFEW to help support the mentoring needs of my UCB colleagues.

Lisa García Bedolla

As a core advisory I bring my twenty years of experience navigating the UC system as a woman of color. I have expertise in understanding complex institutions and ensuring that your needs are met within those institutions. When mentoring junior faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates I have focused on helping them to find their voice, their joy, and the career path that best meets their professional and personal needs.

Linda Rugg

I have struggled as a scholar with writing, and I feel that I have experiences to share around that struggle. I am a first-generation college graduate in my family, having grown up in the rural Midwest, so I am also familiar with the sense of not belonging in an academic environment. I now work in an administrative role on campus, so I have gained a bird's-eye view of our university culture, its richness and its limitations, and this knowledge could perhaps be of interest.